Autism Resources

These are great places to find information online. Please assume that if I have listed anyone who believes we should isolate trans people or sex workers from support, it is in error. Please assume that if anything linked here contributes to white supremacy, I do not want it listed. Let me know if I’ve slipped somewhere.

Individual Pieces I Recommend

Whose Expertise Is It? Evidence for Autistic Adults as Critical Autism Experts

Failure to consider the perspectives of autistic people is problematic not only based on principles that value active participation by people in matters about their lives, but also because some autistic people use the focused interests that are part of the diagnostic criteria for autism to systematically research autism itself (e.g., Hurlbutt and Chalmers, 2002).

Whose Expertise Is It? Evidence for Autistic Adults as Critical Autism Experts

The Difference Between the Autism Community and the Autistic Community

Often when autistic people, their family members, scientists who research autism,  therapists, and anybody for whom autism is a part of their lives are talked about, they are referred to as a community. A lot of the time autism organizations and facilities that are lead by all or at least mostly non-autistics will specifically use the term “Autism Community.”

When they talk about the impact of their work, they will say that they are looking to “make a positive impact on the Autism Community”– which most assume includes autistic people; however, it is often the case that it either does not include us or it puts everyone else before the autistics because they’re supposedly helping us.

When you refer to the Autistic Community, there is no ambiguity there. We all know that means exclusively autistic people.

The Difference Between the Autism Community and the Autistic Community

Ableist Word Profile: Intelligence The whole concept of “intelligence,” as it is used both clinically and in casual conversation, is inherently ableist.

Because we can’t talk about intelligence without talking about stupidity, and stupidity is all tangled up in ableism. If some people are intelligent, some people are stupid. It just falls out that way when you start sorting people on a hierarchy of value. Some are capable of more — so we allocate more resources (money, education, employment, health care) to them — and others are capable of less, so they get less. Less money, less education, worse housing, more abuse. It doesn’t really work out that way though does it?

Ableist Word Profile: Intelligence

You, Yes You, Need Autistic Friends

Your child needs to see you choosing to be around people whose minds work like his. It’s much harder to think your parents hate you and hate your brain when they seek out the company of people who think like you. Seeing the adults who are dearest to you–and like all children, Autistic youth default to loving their parents–seeing them find someone who reminds you of you? That’s supremely important. Do not underestimate the effect this can have, just knowing that your parents would choose to be around you even if they weren’t “stuck” with you.

You, Yes You, Need Autistic Friends

There is ableism somewhere at the heart of your oppression, no matter what your oppression might be.

Once you start to see the basic patterns involved in ableism, you can see why it’s behind core aspects of every other kind of oppression: Every form of oppression uses ableist ideas, actions, and concepts to further some of its most fundamental goals. You’re going to always have your oppressed group being ranked in a hierarchy based on ability and found wanting. You’re going to always have your oppressed group face some degree of medicalization. You’re going to always have your oppressed group treated in ways that disabled people are treated, and the same sorts of reasons used to justify such treatment. And unless you address these things, you can’t address the way your oppression plays out. They happen in areas too central to how the oppression works — you can’t pretend the ableism doesn’t exist and get rid of the whole oppression at the same time.

There is ableism somewhere at the heart of your oppression, no matter what your oppression might be.

We Are Like Your Child

They are your child grown up. Dig deep enough, and you find out the blogger you love didn’t talk until they were 7, or wandered when they were a child, or lives in a care facility, or cannot toilet without help, or CAN speak but loses their words when under stress – the list goes on. 

Autistic children don’t stay children. They become autistic adults. They ARE like your child, and they are sharing their experiences to help others better manage the challenges that they have and are facing.

We Are Like Your Child

A checklist for identifying sources of aggression

One of the most frequent and difficult parental concerns that we see in the autism community is that of aggressive behavior on the part of a child or teenager.  Caring parents are often frustrated at not being able to discern the source of their child’s distress, or worry that while they can handle the physical outbursts of a small child, they won’t know what to do when a child is older and larger.

A checklist for identifying sources of aggression

Is ABA Really “Dog Training for Children”? A Professional Dog Trainer Weighs In.

Before a dog trainer breaks out the operant conditioning, our first task is to ensure that all of the dog’s fundamental needs are being met.

Dogs need to run. Dogs need to dig. Dogs need to chase things. Dogs need to chew things. Dogs need to play with other dogs. These are fundamental needs that cannot be removed from a dog’s psyche, and that can result in a lot of “problem behaviours” if they are not met.

If the dog is afraid or fearful, we gently encourage them to have positive experiences with the things that frighten them. It seems counterintuitive to learn that feeding a dog who is growling at you will end the growling but it does – when the fear is gone, so is the aggression. No operant conditioning required.

There are many times when an owner wants me to “train” the dog out of a behaviour and I refuse because either the behaviour is fear-based, or because the goal of the owner is unreasonable/unethical.

Before you train a dog you need to accept that it is a dog.

Is ABA Really “Dog Training for Children”? A Professional Dog Trainer Weighs In.

Evidence of increased PTSD symptoms in autistics exposed to applied behavior analysis

Based on the findings, the author predicts that nearly half of ABA-exposed autistic children will be expected to meet the PTSD criteria four weeks after commencing the intervention; if ABA intervention persists, there will tend to be an increase in parent satisfaction despite no decrease in PTSS severity.

Evidence of increased PTSD symptoms in autistics exposed to applied behavior analysis

Double Empathy, Explained

But a number of studies also show that autistic people’s social and communication issues are not evident when they interact with other people with autism. For example, in the game of “telephone,” in which a message is relayed in whispers from one person to the next, chains of eight autistic people maintain the fidelity of the message just as well as sets of eight non-autistic people do. It’s only in mixed groups of autistic and non-autistic people that the message quickly degrades.

Double empathy, explained

Is It Trauma or Autism? Or Both?

As I’ve listened to other autistic voices, this same assumption about PTSD canceling autism keeps popping up. Despite their best intentions, professionals seem woefully unprepared to recognize the needs of people who have experience with both.

Is It Trauma or Autism? Or Both?

Want more? Look at this amazing categorized list of useful links and resources. It’s good. Put it in front of your eyeballs because it’s good. There’s also a lovely comprehensive list of autistic bloggers!

Blog Feeds for Your Convenience

These are subscription feeds for sites I have some confidence in, not specifically selected and curated links. It is the best way I know to make sure you are always getting something recent and relevant when you check this page. WordPress or Feedly make it possible for you to create your own reading list that’ll automatically compile itself for you when bloggers post, so feel free to do that to make sure you get what you need with minimal effort.

Disability Language Style Guide

Autistic Women & Nonbinary Network

Musings of an Aspie

YennPurkis: Thoughts on all things Autism and mental health

The Body is not an Apology

Ballastexistenz

Ollibean

Captain Awkward

The Artism Spectrum

Real Social Skills

Speak for Yourself AAC

Autistic Hoya

Hello Michelle Swan

Autistic and Cheerful

Homo Qui Vixit

Theology for Ordinary People

Autism and Expectations

Tania Melnyczuk

Unstrange Mind

Autistic Zebra

Affinity Magazine

ActuallyAutistic Blog List

3 thoughts on “Autism Resources”

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